Archive for April, 2004

Verifying Backups in Windows NT 4 With NTBackup

Sunday, April 11th, 2004

Here’s how to check for backups

1. Login to host using remote desktop (or locally), use administrator credentials.
2. Open up backup utility: Start > run > ntbackup
3. Go to Tools > Report
4. Choose the date you want to check on
5. Look for the following in the log of the choice you selected:
“Verify of System State”, “Verify of C:” or “Verify of E”
6. If you see a start and end date, without errors, then it was successful (“Verify Started, Verify Completed”).

For the full backup of data on the E: drive
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It currently takes about 3.5 hours to complete a full backup, it then takes another 30 minutes to verify the backup.

For the differential backup of data on the E: drive
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It currently takes about 2 minutes to complete a differential backup, it then takes another 1 minute to verify the backup.

For the backup of the C:\ drive and system state
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It currently takes about 6 minutes to complete a full backup, it then takes another 1 minute to verify the backup.

For the differential of the C:\ drive and system state
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It currently takes about 1 minute to complete a differential backup, it then takes another 5 seconds to verify the backup.

Please use the directory on the E:\ drive called, “Restore Test” to test restore anything. If restoring something large, please delete it after you have confirmed that it was successfully restored. If you see that this directory is pushing 10MB, please delete all files in there as well.

RESTORES
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1. Start > run > ntbackup
2. Choose Restore Wizard
3. At the bottom left choose if you want to overwrite and restore to original location, or to a different location.
4. Select what backup repository you would like to restore from
5. Select a directory or file.
6. If prompted to confirm, select OK or Yes.
7. If any other prompts appear, select OK or Yes.
8. Check to ensure your restored file or directory is in the location you selected.

NOTE: Sometimes the differential will be empty. This is because there was no change of files from the time the full backup ran and the differential ran. If this is the case, use the full backup.

Mac OS X Feel Like New

Tuesday, April 6th, 2004

To make your computer think it’s running a fresh installation of Mac OS X,
go into terminal and type the following:

rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone

On the next boot, the system will enter the default registration and setup animation screens that you would typically encounter after a fresh install, including creating an Admin account, network setup, etc.