iOS Backups Continued, and Configuration Profiles

December 14th, 2012 by Allister Banks

In our previous discussion of iOS Backups, the topic of configuration profiles being the ‘closest to the surface’ on a device was hinted at. What that means is, when Apple Configurator restores a backup, that’s the last thing to be applied to the device. For folks hoping to use Web Clips as a kind of app deployment, they need to realize that trying to restore a backup that has the web clip in a particular place doesn’t work – the backup that designates where icons on the home screen line up gets laid down before the web clip gets applied by the profile. It gets bumped to whichever would be the next home screen after the apps take their positions.

This makes a great segue into the topic of configuration profiles. Here’s a ‘secret’ hiding in plain sight: Apple Configurator can make profiles that work on 10.7+ Macs. (But please, don’t use it for that – see below.) iPCU possibly could generate usable ones as well, although one should consider the lack of full screen mode in the interface as a hint: it may not see much in the way of updates on the Mac from now on. iPCU is all you have in the way of an Apple-supported tool on Windows, though. (Protip: activate the iOS device before you try to put profiles on it – credit @bruienne for this reminder.)

Also thanks to @bruienne to the recommendation of the slick p4merge tool

Also thanks to @bruienne to the recommendation of the slick p4merge tool

Now why would you avoid making, for example, a Wi-Fi configuration profile for use on a mac with Apple Configurator? Well there’s one humongous difference between iOS and Macs: individual users. Managing devices with profiles shows Apple tipping their cards: they seem to be saying you should think of only one user per device, and if it’s important enough to manage at all, it should be an always enforced setting. The Profile Manager service in Lion and Mountain Lion Server have an extra twist, though: you can push out settings for Mac users or the devices they own. If you want to manage a setting across all users of a device, you can do so at the Device Group level, which generates extra keys than those that are present in a profile generated by Apple Configurator. The end result is that a Configurator-generated profile will be user-specific, and fail with deployment methods that need to target the System. (Enlarge the above screenshot to see the differences – and yes, there’s a poorly obscured password in there. Bring it on, hax0rs!)

These are just more of the ‘potpourri’ type topics that we find time to share after being caught by peculiarities out in the field.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Comments are closed.