Posts Tagged ‘iPad’

Wishes Granted! Apple Configurator 1.4 and iOS 7

Wednesday, September 25th, 2013

Back in June, we posted about common irritations of iOS(6) device deployment, especially in schools or other environments trying to remove features that could distract students. Just like with the Genie, we asked for three wishes:

- 1. Prevent the addition of other email accounts, or 2. the sign-in (or creation!) of Twitter/Facebook(/Vimeo/Flickr, etc.) accounts

Yay! Rejoice in the implementation of your feature requests! At least when on a supervised device, you can now have these options show up as greyed out.

- 3. Disable the setting of a password lock…

Boo! This is still in the realm of things only an MDM can do for you. But at least it’s not something new that MDM’s need to implement. More agile ways to interact with App Lock should be showing up in a lot more vendors products for a ‘do not pass go, do not collect $200 dollars’ way to lead a group of iPads through the exact app they should be using. Something new we’re definitely looking forward to for MDM vendors to implement is…

Over-the-Air Supervision!

Won’t it be neat when we don’t need to tether all these devices to get those extra management features?

And One More Thing

Screen Shot 2013-09-24 at 2.35.14 PM

Oh, and one last feature I made reference to in passing, you can now sync a Supervised device to a computer! …With the caveat that you need to designate that functionality at the time you move the device into Supervise mode, and the specific Restriction payload needs setting appropriately.

Screen Shot 2013-09-24 at 2.34.29 PM

We hope you enjoy the bounty that a new OS and updated admin tools brings.

Special Considerations for ‘Supervised’ iPads

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

Apple Configurator brings two key features. First, when Supervision is applied, one is able to pull back App ‘codes’ redeemed to devices when it is decided the App should be used on another iPad or simply be removed so as not to distract the current user. The other is when you move to the ‘Assign’ stage, it can become a multi-user device, which helps firewall off multiple users data from each other or facilitate handouts to Apps that support document transfer within Configurator. These are somewhat specialized use cases, so many use it for the basic setup functionality which can be found in other tools, but in a less-optimized workflow than Configurator provides.

Supervised iPads get people a lot of the way toward their common goals, so they sometimes find that Assignment isn’t as necessary. Perhaps they use Google Apps with Drive, or have a webclip they deploy to point folks to a site, and then fill out forms as a way of working on documents or collaborating. This still presents two inevitable events for the random bumps or mishaps that may befall an iPad deployment:
1. What if an iPad is dropped and the screen gets cracked?
2. What if the iPad becomes non-responsive due to a bath in water, or worse, gets lost/forgotten/stolen?

For the first issue, damaged iPads would lose all of the paid App codes redeemed on that device when wiped during repair, so it should be connected to Configurator and unsupervised before sending out. You do so by highlighting the supervised iPad and choosing ‘Unsupervise’ from the Device menu, as shown:
Unsupervise from Device menu
To reclaim the inventory number used by a lost or otherwise non-contactable iPad, it should be removed by following the same process, but holding down the Option key while the unrecoverable iPad is highlighted, and from the Device menu choosing Remove. Unfortunately, new App codes would need to be purchased to replace the Apps used on the non-retrievable iPad.

optionRemove

iOS 7 Management API and Apple Configurator Wishlist Quicky

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

We feel privileged to be living in the modern era, iOS device activation can happen over-the-air, and use of iTunes has almost completely been eclipsed by Apple Configurator. But it isn’t uncommon to hear the sysadmins being referred to as ‘the haters,’ since things can never be easy or nice enough for us. (And in reality, there’s still plenty of conflict and stress to go around without worrying about the reliability or functionality of our tools.) Besides the fact enrollment profiles themselves can always be removed at any time by end users, there are also still surprisingly numerous things that would require manual interaction to manage, and missing integration with other Apple products. With something that could be called iOS7 potentially around the corner, and with no inside information, here’s some of the things that still trip up the modern iOS deployment in certain environments.

As of this point in time, through the official management API and payloads documented in the canonical reference Apple provides, you cannot do the following:

Restrictions
- Disable the setting of a password lock
Especially in education, the accidental turning on of this ‘feature’ has probably sold MDM more than anything else
- Prevent the addition of other email accounts
File transfer and content distribution is still by no means a solved problem, and email has always been a ubiquitous option – but in certain environments we probably don’t want accounts added nilly-willy… (er, strike that, reverse…)
- Prevent the sign-in (or creation!) of Twitter or Facebook accounts
Yay for social media integration! Boo for education or other environments where these devices aren’t to be used ‘socially.’

Account addition OR creation

Apple Configurator can allow the handing out of documents to an app like Adobe Reader(which still has an unfortunate amount of Adobe’s interruptions in its first-time use experience,) and you can collect documents as well when assigned devices get checked back in. The two apps you CAN’T at present add content/documents to? Apple’s own iTunesU and iBooks apps! Nor can you pull in iMovie projects or pictures from the Camera Roll.

The longer you work with these things, the more corner/edge-cases you notice – like the fact you can’t use two MDM services on the same device. It makes sense when you know the moving parts and think about the ramifications, but it still can surprise folks because documentation doesn’t seem to warn against it. (That I’ve found, at least, feel free to correct us on the Twitter or elsewhere!) We mention these things not to say it’s a horrible experience to deploy the devices in most use cases, just to point out there’s always room for improvement and we’re excited to see what the next version might offer.

Casper Focus Now Available

Monday, April 29th, 2013

For a long time I’ve been saying that the #1 challenge with regard to using iOS is content distribution. Others have mirrored that by saying that the device is a content aggregator, etc. The challenge is keeping everyone on the same page, with the same content and distributing administration of all of that to those who need it.

Well, our friends at JAMF software are, as usual, right in the middle of resolving the more challenging issues of the day with regard to iOS and OS X. In this case they’ve released a new tool called Casper Focus that enables rudimentary administrative tasks by teachers.

casper-focus-annotated-UI-no-bleed_1.jpg

 

Now, I don’t want anyone to take the word rudimentary to be a bad thing. You see, accessing and remotely controlling devices can be a big challenge. The learning curve can be steep. By only giving delegated administrators a few options that learning curve can be drastically reduced. Lock, enable, distribute data. These are the very basic tasks teachers need.

Overall, this is yet another great addition to the Casper family of products and 318 is excited to work with our customers to integrate Casper Focus into the environments for our customers where appropriate. Call your Professional Services Manager today for more information!

Introducing Splunk: Funny name, serious logging

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

So, my boss says:

“Write an article called ‘Getting Started with Splunk.’”

I reply:

“What, you think I know all this stuff? This really would be a getting started article.”

But here it is and WOW is Splunk cool!

My only experience with Splunk up to a couple days ago was seeing a T-shirt with “Log is my copilot”. I knew it had something to do with gathering log files and making them easier to read and search. In about an hour I had gone to Splunk’s website to research the product, downloaded and installed it, and started viewing logs from my own system. The Splunk folks have made getting their product into their customer’s hands easy and getting started even easier.

What is Splunk?

Simply put, Splunk can gather just about any kind of data that goes into a log (system logs, website metrics, etc.) into one place and make viewing that data easy. It’s accessed via web browser so it’s accessible on any computer or mobile device such as an iPad.

What do I need to run Splunk?

Practically any common operating system today can run Splunk: Mac OS X, Linux, Windows, FreeBSD and more.

How much does Splunk cost?

Don’t worry about that right now. Download and install the free version. It takes minutes to install and is a no-brainer. Let’s get started.

Getting Splunk

IT managers and directors may be interested in watching the introductory and business case videos with the corporate speak (“operational intelligence” anyone?) and company endorsements. Techs will be interested in getting started. Right on their home page is a big green Free Download button. Go there, click it and locate the downloader for your OS of choice. I downloaded the Mac OS X 10.7 installer to test (and installed it on OS X 10.8 without any issues).

Splunk home

This does require a sign-up to create an account. It takes less than a minute to complete. After submitting the information the 100 MB download begins right away.

While waiting for the download…

When the download is on its way the Splunk folks kindly redirect to a page with some short videos to watch while waiting. Watch this first one called Getting data into Splunk. It’s only a few minutes and this is the first thing to do after getting into Splunk.

Installing and starting Splunk

The download arrives as a double-clickable Apple Installer package. Double-click and install it. Toward the end it opens a simple TextEdit window with instructions for how to start, stop and access the newly installed Splunk site.

Install done

Files are installed in /Applications/splunk and resemble a UNIX file system.

Splunk application folder

Open the Terminal application found in /Applications/Utilities and run the command /Applications/splunk/bin/splunk start. If this is the first time running Splunk it prompts to accept its license agreement. Tap the spacebar to scroll through and read the agreement or type “q” to quit and agree to the license.

EULA

Accepting the agreement continues to start Splunk where it displays some brief setup messages.

Starting Splunk

The setup then provides the local HTTP address for the newly installed Splunk site. Open this in a web browser to get to the login screen. The first login requires that the administrator account password be reset.

Splunk login

Following along with the Getting data into Splunk video, Splunk will need some information. Mac OS X stores its own log files. Let’s point to those.

Click the Add Data link to begin.

New Splunk home

Since Mac OS X’s log files are local to the machine, click A file or directory of files.

Add files

Click Next to specify local files.

Add local logs

This opens a window that exposes not only Mac OS X’s visible folders but its invisible folders as well. Browse to /var/log/system.log and click the Select button.

Browse logs folder

For now, opt to skip previewing the log file and click Continue.

Path to system.log

Now, let’s opt to monitor not only the system.log file but the entire /var/log folder containing dozens of other log files as well. Note that Splunk can watch rotated and zipped log files too. Click Save to finish adding logs.

Add /var/log folder

Let’s start searching!

Succes, start searching

The Search window initially displays a list of all logs Splunk is monitoring. To narrow the search change the time filter drop down menu to Last 60 minutes. This will make the results a little easier to see on a system that’s only been running a short while.

Last 24 hours

Now, search for install*. Splunk will only search for the word “install” without providing the asterisk as a wildcard character. Splunk supports not only wildcard searches but booleans, parentheses, quotes, etc. It will return every instance recorded in the logs that matches the search criteria. It also creates an interactive bar chart along the top of the page to indicate the number of occurrences found for the search at particular times.

Search for install

To further refine the search, Option+click most any word in the log entries below and Splunk will automatically add the necessary syntax to remove an item. In this case the install* search returned installinstaller and installd. Option+clicking installd changed the search criteria to install* NOT installd.

Modified search

Now what?

Continue exploring the videos to understand Splunk’s possibilities and take advantage of its Splunk Tutorial, which is available online as well as in PDF format for offline viewing. They do a great job leading users through setup and creating reports.

Still asking about price? Good.

The free version remains free but doesn’t include many features that really make it sing such as monitoring and alerts, multiple user accounts and support beyond the Splunk website. Cost depends primarily on the amount of data you want to suck into Splunk and have it watch. It’s not cheap but for an enterprise needing to meet certain service level requirements it beats browsing through multiple servers trying to find the right log with the right information.

FYI, putting together this 1,000-word article probably took me 10 times longer than performing the Splunk install itself and beginning to learn it. It’s really well-done and easy to use. Splunk makes getting started simple.

Building a Mac and iOS App Store Software Update Service

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

Let’s say you run a network with a large number of Mac OS X or iOS (or, more likely, both) devices. Software Update and the two App Stores (Mac App Store and iOS App Store) make keeping all those devices up-to-date a pretty straightforward process. They are a huge improvement compared with the rather old-fashioned practice of looking through applications, visiting the web site for each one and manually downloading updated versions. When updating two or more similar machines, of course, one only needed to download the updated version once, then copy it to each other machine. Better, but a process that when performed across a lot of machines requires a lot of work.

However, even though the App Store and Software Update Server in Mac OS X Server make things easier, there’s no simple way to download things once and distribute the downloaded files to multiple machines for items purchased on the App Store. When large updates come out (such as a new version of iOS), you’re essentially downloading huge amounts of data to each and every machine, and if machines are set to automatically download updates, you could even have a large number of them downloading simultaneously.

Of course you can run your own Software Update service in Mac OS X Server, but this requires that every client machine be configured to use the local server. This works well for machines under your control, but for all those people who bring in their own laptops this doesn’t help.

What’s worse is that there’s currently no way whatsoever to run a Software Update-like service for App Store purchases. Imagine if you have a lab of dozens or hundreds of Macs with Final Cut X or iPads (or iPhones, iPod Touches, whatever comes out next with iMovie or ). Any time there’s an update you’re potentially downloading over a gigabyte per machine in the case of Final Cut X or 70 megabytes or so in the case of iMovie. That can easily add up to a tremendous amount of traffic and the congestion, complaints and headaches which go with it..

What’s needed is an easy way to cache App Store downloads. While we’re at it, it would also be nice to transparently have machines use our own Software Update server. Let’s be even a little more ambitious and do this without needing Mac OS X Server. Aw, heck – let’s make it work on any reasonably Unix-like OS.

So how do we do this? The App Stores and Software Update services use http for fetching files. So what we need to do is to capture those http requests and either redirect them to a local store of Software Update files or locally cached App Store files.

Just as an aside, it’d be tremendously difficult to create a local store of App Store files if for no other reason than the fact that there are currently more than half a million applications. Add to this the rate at which updates become available and your machine would probably never be finished attempting to download all of the applications! Considering this, we’re looking at running Apache and squid on our Unix-like machine and doing a little redirection magic on whatever device does NAT or routes for us.

Note: There’s no reason that the same machine can’t do both NAT/routing and Apache/squid, although in most environments we are assuming that the machine would simply be a proxy for Mac or iOS-based devices. To make this example end-to-end though, we’ll run the router on the host.

Our example uses a Mac OS X (non-Server) machine running Leopard which is doing both NAT and running our Apache and squid software. We’re simply using the Internet Sharing service, the public network interface is en0 (which we don’t use anywhere) and the interface which will serve our iOS and Apple clients is en1 and has the address 10.0.2.1.

Everyone has their own favorite way of installing software on Unix-like OSes and a discussion about which is best and why would certainly be outside the scope of this article. In these examples we’re using NetBSD’s pkgsrc for no other reason than the fact that it will compile packages from source with a base directory which is easily configurable (feel free to use ports or some other automated tool according to what platform you are using). Get pkgsrc (usually via cvs; we’ll assume it’s put into /usr which can be as simple as:

cd /usr ; setenv CVSROOT :pserver:anoncvs@anoncvs.netbsd.org:/cvsroot ; cvs checkout -P pkgsrc

And then run /usr/pkgsrc/bootstrap/bootstrap like so:

cd /usr/pkgsrc/bootstrap/
./bootstrap --prefix /usr/local --pkgdbdir /usr/local/var/db/pkg --sysconfdir /usr/local/etc --varbase /usr/local/var --ignore-case-check

This puts all files into /usr/local including logs and configuration files, so keeping your system clean is simple and keeping track of the differences between built-in and pkgsrc software is easy. Next, install pkgsrc’s www/squid and www/apache (and net/wget if your Unix doesn’t already have it):

cd /usr/pkgsrc/www/squid
bmake update
cd /usr/pkgsrc/www/apache22
bmake update
cd /usr/pkgsrc/net/wget
bmake update

Note that on systems like Mac OS X which come with GNU make by default, that pkgsrc uses bmake; if you have BSD make already, just use make. Another note is that /usr/local/sbin is not in Mac OS X’s path by default, so add /usr/local/sbin to /etc/paths if you’re going to use it.

Now that the software is installed in consistent locations we can configure it. The squid.conf file only needs one line to be changed; everything else is added. Find the line which says:

http_port 3128

And change it to:

http_port 3128 intercept

Then add the following lines:

maximum_object_size_in_memory 4096 KB
cache_replacement_policy heap LFUDA
cache_dir ufs /usr/local/var/squid/cache 16384 16 256
maximum_object_size 2097152 KB
refresh_pattern -i .ipa$ 360 90% 10800 override-expire ignore-no-cache ignore-no-store ignore-private ignore-reload ignore-must-revalidate
refresh_pattern -i .pkg$ 360 90% 10080 override-expire ignore-no-cache ignore-no-store ignore-private ignore-reload ignore-must-revalidate
acl no_cache_local dstdomain 10.0.2.1
cache deny no_cache_local
redirect_program /usr/local/bin/rewrite.pl

These settings are chosen to cache large files up to 2 gigabytes in size in a 16 gig cache on disk and to ignore cache directives with regards to .pkg and .ipa files. Adjust to your own liking. Of course, replace 10.0.2.1 with the private IP of your machine. The cache deny with that address is used to make sure that redirected Software Update files are not cached in squid which would just take up room which better used for App Store files.

The URL rewriting script (create /usr/local/bin/rewrite.pl) just changes Apple Software Update URLs to point to our server:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
$|=1;
while (<>) {
s@http://swscan.apple.com@http://10.0.2.1/swscan.apple.com@;
s@http://swcdn.apple.com@http://10.0.2.1/swcdn.apple.com@;
s@http://swquery.apple.com@http://10.0.2.1/swquery.apple.com@;
print;
}

Next we configure Apache. The location you choose for the Software Update files can be anywhere (in our example, they’re on a FireWire attached drive mounted at /Volumes/sw_updates/) which needs to be allowed in the Apache configuration.

Add to /usr/local/etc/httpd/httpd.conf:

<Directory “/Volumes/sw_updates/”>
Options Indexes FollowSymLinks
AllowOverride None
Order allow,deny
Allow from all
</Directory>
<VirtualHost *:80>
ServerAdmin hostmaster@318.com
DocumentRoot “/Volumes/sw_updates”
ErrorLog “/usr/local/var/log/httpd/swupdate_error_log”
CustomLog “/usr/local/var/log/httpd/swupdate_access_log” common
</VirtualHost>

The log lines are purely optional. If you don’t add them, logs will still be written at /usr/local/var/log/httpd/access_log and error_log.

Next, we configure ipfw (in the case of Mac OS X or FreeBSD) to redirect all port 80 traffic transparently to our squid instance. If you’re using a different device for NAT/routing or different firewalling software such as ipfilter, see the examples listed below.

ipfw add 333 fwd 10.0.2.1,3128 tcp from any to any 80 recv en1

Note that on Snow Leopard and Lion you’ll need to make this change, too:

sysctl -w net.inet.ip.scopedroute=0

ipfilter would look like this for the same ipfw task from above (if you’re using Linux):

rdr en1 0.0.0.0/0 port 80 -> 10.0.2.1 port 3128 tcp

Again, the local private IP is 10.0.2.1 and the local private interface is en1; substitute your IP and interface.

Finally, we need to mirror all Apple Software Updates. A simple shell script can do this. Save this file somewhere (named mirror_swupdate.sh, for instance) and run it from cron now and then, perhaps once a night:

#!/bin/sh

 

location=$1 # This is the root of our Software Update tree
mkdir -p $1
cd $1

for index in index-leopard-snowleopard.merged-1.sucatalog index-leopard.merged-1.sucatalog index-lion-snowleopard-leopard.merged-1.sucatalog
do
wget --mirror http://swscan.apple.com/content/catalogs/others/$index

 

for swfile in `cat swscan.apple.com/content/catalogs/others/$index | grep "http://" | awk -F">" '{ print $2 }' | awk -F"<" '{ print $1 }'`
do
echo $swfile
wget --mirror "$swfile"
done
done

Invoke this with the top of the tree of your Software Update files as you’ve used in the Apache config, like so:

./mirror_swupdate.sh /Volumes/sw_updates

Expect this to run for a long time the first time you run this because you’ll be downloading around 60 gigabytes of updates. Every time it runs afterwards, though, files won’t be downloaded again unless they change (which they won’t; new updates will show up as new files).

Start squid and Apache, then tail your Apache log and run Software Update to test:

/usr/local/share/examples/rc.d/apache start
/usr/local/share/examples/rc.d/squid start
tail -f /usr/local/var/log/httpd/swupdate_access_log

At this point, you can redirect your software updates to the host. Updates for both the Mac App Store and iOS are also now cached. In the next article we’ll look at using some squid extensions to enable you to block applications from the App Stores or block updates in the event that an update is problematic.

318 Featured in CIO Again

Thursday, March 10th, 2011

CIO ran another article on the iPad featuring 318′s Director of Technology, Charles Edge. This time focusing on preparing enterprises for iPad 2. You can find the article at http://www.cio.com/article/675163/How_to_Prepare_Your_Enterprise_for_iPad_2_Expert_Tips?source=rss_all.

If iPad and iPad 2 integration is something you feel your enterprise needs help with then please feel free to contact your 318 PSM or sales@318.com for more information on this exciting aspect of our portfolio of services.

318 Director of Technology Interviewed By V3

Saturday, March 5th, 2011

Charles Edge, Director of Technology at 318, did an interview with Iain Thomson of V3, a popular UK-based technology news site. The article, available at http://www.v3.co.uk/v3/analysis/2275079/apple-ipad-tablets-enterprise looks at iPads in enterprise environments. While I don’t agree with the fact that iPad 2 provides little reason to upgrade, I do think the article turned out pretty good.

If you are interested in purchasing iPad 2, please contact your 318 professional services manager and we can get a quote out to you asap!

Final Cut Server Client for iPad

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Yes, you heard that right. You can now browse assets, edit metadata, annotate clips and download clip proxies from Final Cut Server using an iPad.

ClipTouch, from Factorial in New Zealand is a slick, sleek client for Final Cut Server. Per the Factorial website, it supports:

– No server configuration required
– Search and discover assets
– Directly download and view clip proxies
– Supports the default proxy setting
– Clip timecode display
– Change asset metadata
– Browse and add annotations
– Archive and Restore assets to any archive device
– Respects permission sets based on your login
– Supports direct and VPN connections

After using it to view some assets that were optimized using the special compressor settings that Factorial posted, I have to say that I’m impressed with how well it works and with how the interface just looks plain sexy. A job well done! Check it out on the App Store.

318 Featured in IT Business Edge

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

318 has been a leader in bringing iOS into the Enterprise for some time. We have been sitting alongside our customers, working to get iPhones integrated into organizations of all sizes for years. Since the release of the iPad the quantity of projects we are involved with continues to increase. Now, 318 has been featured in a slide show on IT Business Edge illustrating “how 318’s team is advising clients who are trying to bring iPads and iPhones into enterprise environment.”

And if you would like to discuss how your organization can deploy iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch please feel free to contact your 318 Professional Services Manager or sales@318.com for more information.

Book On Enterprise iOS Integration Available

Monday, December 20th, 2010

The 6th book from 318′s staff is now available: Enterprise iPhone and iPad Administrator’s Guide. In this title, Charles Edge, the Director of Technology at 318, takes a look at lessons learned in our numerous iOS integration projects, from procurement to deployment to patch management. Per the publisher, Apress, the following indicates who the book is intended for:

This book is intended for IT staff members that will be charged with planning an iPhone and ipad implementation or pilot program, as well as those that will be charged with ultimately deploying and provisioning the devices and delivering support to iPhone and iPad users. Readers should have an existing background in IT management, systems administration, and end user support working in a medium to large business or enterprise environment.

If you are considering doing a large scale integration or remediation project for iOS-based devices in your environment then contact your 318 Professional Services Manager or sales@318.com for more information on how 318 can assist you in your endeavors.

318 Press Releases

Friday, December 17th, 2010

Today, 318 released two press releases pertaining to initiatives within the mobility space. These include the following:

http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/Challenged-by-Deployment-of-Apple-iPads-in-Your-Enterprise-Tips-From-318-Consulting-1371111.htm

http://www.marketwire.com/press-release/Leading-Enterprise-Class-Apple-Consultancy-318-Becomes-iPad-Reseller-1371114.htm

Also worth note is that 318 has been a reseller for Research in Motion, the makers of the Blackberry and Blackberry Enterprise Server, Google Apps and a number of other solutions that fit nicely into the mobility space. If you would like to discuss any of these topics please reach out to us at 877.318.1318 for more information on services and products that 318 can work to integrate and manage for your organization.

Have iPad, Must Print?

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010

iOS 4.2 introduced a number of new features for the iPad. One of the most talked about was multi-tasking, along with AirPlay and Game Center. But another feature allows the iPad to be used by more people when at work: AirPrint. AirPrint introduces the ability to wirelessly print to AirPrint-enabled printers.

AirPrint-enabled printers are not yet common though, with HP having a number of devices supporting AirPrint currently include HP’s Envy e-All-in-One D410a, Photosmart Plus e-AiO (B2210a), Photosmart Premium e-AiO (C310a) and Photosmart Premium Fax e-AiO (C410a).

If you have a printer that you love and don’t want to wait for a new version of the firmware that supports AirPrint or want to buy one, then there is a great little app called Printopia that can be used to print through your computers, or even to image files on your computer. Printopia can be found at http://www.ecamm.com/mac/printopia.

Printing is not yet available for all apps that you may have installed. It is built into Safari, Mail, Photos, Pages, Keynote and Numbers. Printing is also available in some newer versions of third party applications.

Note: Printing is not available for any devices that do not yet support multi-tasking (which includes the iPhone 3g by the way).

iPad 3G Now Available

Friday, April 30th, 2010

The iPad 3G (Wi-Fi + 3G) is now available for purchase at your favorite Apple Store or online from $629 to $829. They are great devices. With data plans from $14.99 to $29.99, you can take a wireless network with you anywhere that you go for less than the cost of one day worth of wireless access at many hotels.

There are a number of architectural changes that may need to occur in order to most effectively support these devices, so if you find that some changes need to occur in your environment, contact your 318 account manager for assistance.

Access File Shares from iPad

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Note: For more information about the information contained in this article, contact us for a professional consultation.

As the iPad eeks its way into businesses we’re starting to hear a very common question: How do I access my files on the server? While you can enable WebDAV on most modern file servers and access data that way, or look to the cloud, many simply want a way to tap into existing SMB file shares. Well, you’re in luck!

Stratopherix (http://www.stratospherix.com) has released FileBrowser, an application for the iPad that can mount a file share and provide access to the resources on the share. FileBrowser will allow you to connect to servers and then access files as you would from a regular desktop computer, wirelessly or over a network connection.

If you find that you cannot access file shares once installed, then we have seen some policy issues on file servers (mostly those that do double-duty as a domain controller) or if you are remotely then you might need to either forward ports to the server or first establish a VPN into the environment. If you still cannot access them then contact your 318 account manager and we will be happy to assist with any needs you might have.

Happy File Browsing!

iPad is Now Here!

Saturday, April 3rd, 2010

The iPad is finally here! 

While many will be standing in lines for hours at Apple stores around the country, you can also contact 318 and we will work with you to get an order processed without having the long wait. 318 has also been working with many customers preparing to deploy the iPad, and so if you have Exchange integration or mass deployment questions please feel free to contact your account manager today, or for new customers, the office at 310-581-9500.

“And Now For Something Completely Different”

Thursday, January 28th, 2010

This week, Apple launched their newest product: the iPad. The sleek iPad is a revolutionary new look at the NetBook, but able to run most of the 140,000 applications that are in the App Store for the iPhone. Given the popularity of the App Store so far and the new development methods introduced for the iPad you can rest assured that even more feature rich applications will be developed for the iPad as time goes on. Not that Apple hasn’t led the charge in using the new iPad APIs: iWork has been ported to the iPad. This means that you can create rich Pages, Numbers and Keynote presentations in addition to interacting with a number of cloud based services and leveraging those existing iPhone applications.


The iPad is aluminum and glass, comes with up to 64GB of space, a multi-touch LED screen, 802.11n, Bluetooth and can have a 3G data connection for only $29.99 per month. All of this in a secure, easy-to-use interface that we’ve all grown accustomed to!

Want help integrating the iPad into your Enterprise? Let 318 know if you have interest with mass deployment, purchasing or development: our developers are on hand to work with you on commercial and enterprise applications as needed!